The Haitian Diaspora Federation of France and Subchapters

With an area of 248,573 sq miles. a  population of 67.08 million ( March 2020), GDP of US$ $2.7 trillion (2019), and per capita of US$ 42,400 (2019), France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. 

France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country’s largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice. French territories with significant numbers of Haitien include Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana, and St Martin.  France has long been a global centre of art, science, and philosophy. It hosts the world’s fifth-largest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites and is the leading tourist destination, receiving around 83 million foreign visitors annually, but if it counted the nights spent by non-residents tourist, France become the sixth country in world with 138 millions of nights, behind United States, China, Spain, Italy and United Kingdom.

Noted history of France includes 1) inhabited by the Gauls, a Celtic people; 2) Rome annexed the area in 51 BC;  in 476, Germanic Franks formed the Kingdom of Francia; in 843;  3) The Treaty of Verdun partitioned Francia into East Francia, Middle Francia and West Francia. West Francia, which became the Kingdom of France; 4) in  987; emerged as a major European power in the Middle Ages under King Philip Augustus; 5) global colonial empire was established during the Renaissance,  6) France became Europe’s dominant cultural, political, and military power in the 17th century under Louis XIV: 7) In the late 18th century, the French Revolution overthrew the absolute monarchy, establishing one of modern history’s earliest republics and drafting the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, which expresses the nation’s ideals to this day; 8) in  19th century, Napoleon established the First French Empire; 9} Third Republic in 1870. 

France was a major participant in World War I, from which it emerged victorious, and was one of the Allies in World War II, but came under occupation by the Axis powers in 1940. Following liberation in 1944, a Fourth Republic was established and later dissolved in the course of the Algerian War. The Fifth Republic, led by Charles de Gaulle, was formed in 1958 and remains today. Algeria and nearly all the other colonies became independent in the 1960s, with most retaining close economic and military connections with France

Noteworthy is Haiti is a former colony of France that fought France’s Mighty Power for its independence in 1804.   For fear of slaves’ insurgency expansion, though, Haiti was later isolated by other countries, including the United States of America for whose independence Haitian brave soldiers had just fought for in Savannah Georgia.  Of note, In 1825, France, with warships at the ready, demanded 150 million francs (US$21 billion today) and a 50% discount on goods that Haiti exported to France. In 1838, France reluctantly agreed to reduce the debt to 90 million francs over 30 years.. With then-per capita of US$350, Historians say that Haiti had to pay the ransom  partly  with timber, credited to the  beginning of deforestation in Haiti.  Haiti was forced to pay the ransom for its audacity. This, recently, sparked an unsettled debate surrounding France’s reparation to impoverished Haiti (per capita of US$759 today). Fort de Joux, France is where Toussaint Louverture was imprisoned for his audacity and where he reportedly died. 

France is a developed country with the world’s seventh-largest economy by nominal GDP, and the tenth-largest by PPP. In terms of aggregate household wealth, it ranks fourth in the world France performs well in international rankings of education, health care, life expectancy, and human development France is considered a great power in global affairs being one of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council with the power to veto and an official nuclear-weapon state. It is a leading member state of the European Union and the Eurozone

Nonetheless, France’s culture, language, economy, and education and employment  opportunities are  attributed to the  attraction of  a large population of Haitians to France . Today, over 100,000 residents of Haitian origins live in France.  Up to the 1970s, Haitians in France constituted an elite student population from Haiti.  Over the past forty (40) years, France has attracted more popular and working-class Haitians. Today, the exact statistic is unknown, but community leaders estimate that upward 200,000 Haitians and descendants live in France. This underlines the need for a census.

Like Brazil and Chile, Haitian Migration in France and territories faces less challenges – migration,  integration, assimilation, discrimination, heath and economic disparities, relative poverty –  more than most countries. However,  the Haitian  diaspora’s collective engagement can offer improvement.   In a glance of hope, there are some basic structures in place that can serve a springboard.  There is  one Haitian Embassy in  Paris and a consulate  in Bordeaux, France, underlining  the presence of a significant number of Haitians. However,  their involvement with and support to this  diaspora is fluid. There is a Haitian Diaspora Federation of Europe inFrance but no reported Haitian business or church  by Google search. Of note, there are many Haitians and descendants who live in France’s territories  – Guadeloupe,  Martinique, St Martin, and French Guiana.  The overseas territories or department are governed by local elected assemblies and by the French Parliament and French government —  Minister of Overseas – who oversees issues related to the overseas territories. This,  geopolitically, explains why Guadeloupe, Martinique, St Martin, and French Guyana’s subchapters are  placed under the Haitian Diaspora Federation of France.  In addition, there are other sensitive intricacies to be mindful of.   Along with the United States of America  and Canada, France is part of the G7, UN, OAS, and the Core Group in Haiti. Therein is a lot of power.  And therein is also a lot of powerplay. 

In summary, upward of 200.000 Haitians and descendants live and work in France and territories. This community faces less challenges than in other countries. This community is also blessed with solution-oriented resources – people, diplomatic outlets, nonprofits organizations, including Churches.  However, linkage between them and the greater Haitian diaspora is tenuous.  That leads to dismal  outcome and criticisms to overcome.  Meanwhile this diaspora and Haiti’s challenges continue. The Haitian Diaspora Federation is undertaking the task of connecting the dots for result-oriented collective engagement.

With a population of 400,056 people (2019), GDP of US$11.7 billion (20106), and  per capita of US$21,780 (2016),  Guadeloupe is an archipelago of more than 12 islands, as well as islets and rocks situated where the northeastern Caribbean Sea meets the western Atlantic Ocean.  It is in the Leeward Islands in the northern part of the Lesser Antilles, a partly volcanic island arc. To the north lies Antigua and Barbuda and the British Oversea Territory of Montserrat, with Dominica lying to the south. It is reliant upon mainland France for large subsidies and imports and public administration. Unemployment is especially high among the youth population.

Martinique’s  history is marked by 1) first populated by indigenous peoples of the Americas as far back as 3000 BC;  2) November 3, 1493, Christopher Columbus landed on the island of Guadeloupe in an effort to find fresh;  3) in 1759 British Invasion of Guadeloupe; 4) the 1763 Treaty of Paris, France forfeited its Canadian colonies in exchange for Guadeloupe; 5) The 1789 French Revolution brought chaos to Guadeloupe —  under new revolutionary law free people of colour were entitled to equal rights;  6) in 1794,amid the anarchic political situation, Britain invaded Guadeloupe to which the French responded by sending in soldiers led by Victor Hugues, who retook the lands and abolished slavery; 7) the prefect represents the government (French President); 8) three senators are chosen for the Senate of France by indirect election; 9) one deputy from one of each of the first, second, third, and fourth constituencies to the National Assembly of France

The economy of Guadeloupe depends on tourism, agriculture, light industry and services. Guadeloupe is reliant upon mainland France for large subsidies and imports and public administration is the largest single employer on the islands, Unemployment is especially high among the youth population.

Combined with free education, national healthcare, and stipend for children, the aforementioned attributes attract a large number of Haitians to Guadeloupe. Guadeloupe became a destination of choice for Afro-Caribbean immigrants in the 1970s. Census data reveals that the pattern of Haitian migration to Guadeloupe over a period of thirty-five years—with arrival peaks and slow-downs — often correlates with both Haitian and Guadeloupean political and economic events, the first wave of Haitian Migration was mainly of maids. This wave continued and  was reinforced after the earthquake that rocked Haiti in 2010. Although there is no official statistics available,  according to the Joshua project, the number of Haitian descents  in Guadeloupe is estimated at 23,000. However,  community leaders estimate upward 40.000 haitians and dependants live in guadeloupe. This underlines the need for a census. 

Like in France, Haitian  migration to Guadeloupe faces less challenges – migration,  integration, assimilation, discrimination, heath and economic disparities, relative poverty – especially after the recent hurricane.  However, Obviously, the above have their roots in the failure of the Haitian  diaspora’s collective engagement.  In a glance of hope, there are some basic structures in place that can serve a springboard. There is  one Haitian consulate in Pointe à Pitre, underlining  the presence of a significant number of Haitians, but their involvement with and support to this diaspora is fluid.  There is a nonprofit Haitian organization — Association Educative Pour Le Développement Durable D’Haiti, but no reported Haitian church. 

IIn summary, upward of 40.000 Haitians and descendants live and work in Guadeloupe. This community faces less challenges than in other countries. This community is also blessed with solution-oriented resources – people, diplomatic outlets, nonprofit organizations.  However, linkage between them and the greater Haitian diaspora is tenuous.  That leads to dismal  outcome and criticisms to overcome.  Meanwhile this diaspora and Haiti’s challenges continue. The Haitian Diaspora Federation is undertaking the task of connecting the dots for result-oriented collective engagement.

With an area of 1,128 square kilometers, population of 376,480 inhabitants (2016) and GDP of  US$11,38.4 billion euros (2016),  Martinique is an insular region of France located in the Lesser Antilles of the West Indies in the eastern Caribbean Sea., with a land area of 1,128 square kilometers and a population. With all the privileges — free education, national Healthcare, and family support — MartiniqueLike Guadeloupe, it is an overseas region of France, consisting of a single overseas department. One of the Windward Islands, it is directly north of Saint Lucia, northwest of Barbados and south of Dominica. As one of the eighteen regions of France, Martinique is part of the European Union, and its currency is the euro. Martinique is a relatively poor country that is dependent on France for subsidies. 

Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana share the same history and economy, with minor intricacies.  

Like Guadeloupe,  Martinique became a destination of choice for Afro-Caribbean immigrants in the 1970s. Census data reveals that the pattern of Haitian migration to Martinique over a period of thirty-five years—with arrival peaks and slow-downs—often correlates with both Haitian and Martinique political and economic events, the first wave of Haitian Migration was mainly of maids. In transit to other destinations, this wave continues and  was reinforced after the earthquake that rocked Haiti in 2010. Although there is no official statistics available, the Joshua project, the number of Haitian descents  in Guadeloupe is estimated at 3,000.  This underlines the need for a census. 

Like in France, Haitian  migration to Martinique faces less challenges – migration,  integration, assimilation, discrimination, heath and economic disparities, relative poverty.   However, Obviously, the above have their roots in the failure of the Haitian  diaspora’s collective engagement.  In a glance of hope, there are some basic structures in place that can serve a springboard.   there is  one Haitian consulate in Pointe à Pitre, underlining  the presence of a significant number of Haitians. But its involvement with and support to this  diaspora is fluid. There is no known Haitian Business or church but there is a nonprofit Haitian organization — Association Educative Pour Le Developpement Durable D’Haiti.

In summary, there are some underutilised resources available in the Haitian community of Martinique.  However, linkage between them and the greater Haitian diaspora is unfortunately tenuous. That leads to dismal  outcome and criticisms to overcome.  Meanwhile this diaspora and Haiti challenges continue. The Haitian Diaspora Federation is undertaking the task of connecting the dots for result-oriented collective engagement.

With a an area of 32,253 sq. miles,  population of 296,711 (2019), GDP of 5.4 billion (2016), and per capita of  US$8,300 (2016), French Guiana is the second largest an overseas department and region of France on the northern, Atlantic coast of South America in the Guianas. It borders Brazil to the east and south and Suriname to the west. French Guiana is the only French territory of the mainland Americas. 

Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana share the same history and economy, with minor intricacies.  Although little economic data  is available, French Guiana and Haiti  share similar history and culture, and economy. French Guiana, a European Union (EU) territory that is already dealing with economic and social upheavals.  However, there may be  social and economic realities of the Haitian natives and descendants who live in French Guiana due to the poor economy, which is tied closely to that of mainland France through subsidies and imports.  Instead Guyana is now being used as a hub for Haitians to get to their ultimate destination — Brazil, Mexico, USA.

“They are applying for transit visas in order to travel to the US border”, the publisher added. 

 

Guyana’s immigration records show that 8,476 Haitians arrived here and 1,170 later departed. Brazil’s immigration records show that 6,925 Haitians arrived in that country and, except for 129, the majority left,”  said Winston Felix, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

 

“… thousands of Haitians are leaving Guyana at  several unofficial crossings to the neighboring Brazil.  The numbers obtained from both the Department and from Brazil confirm that the Haitians are passing through these countries on their way to a final destination,”  he added. 

Combined with free education, national healthcare, and stipend for children, the aforementioned attributes attract a large number of Haitians to Guiana..  According to the Joshua project, the number of Haitian descents  in French Guyana is estimated at 23,000. However, considering the transit element cited above, the exact number is not known. This underlines the need for a census.

Like France, Haitian  migration to Guyana faces less  challenges – migration,  integration, assimilation, discrimination, heath and economic disparities, relative poverty.   However, Obviously, the above have their roots in the failure of the Haitian  diaspora’s collective engagement.  In a glance of hope, there are some basic structures in place that can serve a springboard.  there is  one Haitian consulate in Cayenne, Guyana, underlining  the presence of a  significant number of Haitians. However,  its involvement with and support to this  diaspora is fluid.  There are No reported Haitian diaspora businesses  in  Guyana. Financing and expertise are cited as deterrents. There is no known Haiti church  but there is nonprofit Haitian organizations  — Association of Haitian Nationals (AHNIG).

In summary, there are some underutilised resources available in the Haitian community of French Guiana.  However, linkage between them and the greater Haitian diaspora is unfortunately tenuous. That leads to dismal  outcome and criticisms to overcome.  Meanwhile this diaspora and Haiti challenges continue. The Haitian Diaspora Federation is undertaking the task of connecting the dots for result-oriented collective engagement.



With an area of 37sq.miles,  population of 72,239 (2014), per capita of US$15.000, Saint Martin is an island in the northeast Caribbean Sea, approximately 300 km east of Puerto Rico. Its GDP is not reported.

St Martin History is marked by 1) inhabited by Carib amerindians before;  2) discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493 on behalf of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella I of Spain, 3)in 1633  the Spaniards captured St. Martin; 4) On 23 March 1648 Treaty of Concordia, the Kingdom of France and the Dutch Republic agreed to divide the island between their two territories;  5) The southern Dutch part comprises Sint Maarten with a nominated Governor under the jurisdiction of Netherland majesty;  6) and the northern part is French St Martin, under the jurisdiction of France-nominated Governor –“prefet”; 7) Despite differences in culture — french language in St Martin, english language in Sint Maarten — both, cooperatively, share good neighbor practices — neighbor is family. They share resources — port, airport, human resources, no restriction on border crossing. This is unlike Haiti and Dominican Republic, the other island shared by two sovereign states, where Haitians mainly live in the Bateyes.  

The main industry of the island is tourism. With one million visitors annually, 85% of the workforce was engaged in the tourist industry.its  tourism-fueled economy, the island is reported to have the highest per capita income in the Caribbean. The island heavily relies on importation of its commodities, including food. This is one area Haiti could exploit.

Combined with free education, national healthcare, and stipend for children, the aforementioned attributes attract a large population of Haitians in both St Martin — the France’s  territory — and Sint Maarten — the Kingdom of Netherlands’ Territory. Like Guadeloupe (a France’s territory) and Aruba (a Kingdom of Netherlands’ Territory), the island became a destination of choice for Haitian immigrants in the 1950’s and peaked in the 70’s  with their tourism construction boom. Family reunification and Haiti’s 2010 earthquake fuel the exponential increase of haitian migration to the Island.  Statistics are scarce, but the haitian population is estimated at 10-20,000. This underlines the need for a census. Of note, most of the Haitians live in St Martin, owing to Haiti’s cultural ties with France.  Notwithstanding geopolitics, the St Martin subchapter of the Haitian Diaspora Federation of France is scheduled to serve Haitians in both St Martin and Sint Maarten. 

Like in France, Haitian  migration to St Martin faces less challenges – migration,  integration, assimilation, discrimination, heath and economic disparities, relative poverty.  However, their condition in Sint Maarten is less settled and needs improvement. Observers fault the lack of haitian collective engagement as the root cause. The prospect of such in st martin may not be easy. There is NO reported Census data available, underlining the need to commission one. There are NO reported Haitian Consulates, Haitian Businesses, Haitian church or Haitian nonprofit organizations by Google search, making linkage a difficult but achievable task.

While this diaspora and Haiti challenges continue, there is no starting point in the Haitian community of St Martin. The Haitian Diaspora Federation is undertaking the task of connecting this and the larger diaspora for result-oriented collective engagement.

Sign up for updates from the Haitian Diaspora Federation

powered by MailChimp!

Registration

Forgotten Password?

Website Under Construction

Thank you for visiting The Haitian diaspora Federation. This website is under construction. Please sign up for our newsletter to receive an update when the website is complete and visit us again soon!

Log In